Indian cycle rickshaw driver sleeps on his bicycle by Dmitry Rukhlenko

Best street photography destinations in the world

  • AuthorKav Dadfar
  • Reading Time4-5 mins

Street photography can provide some of the most engaging photos. So here are 10 of the best street photography destinations in the world…

1 Fez (Morocco)

Market in Morocco. Photo by Irene – f/3.5 | ISO 320 | 1/25s

This historic northeastern Moroccan city is one best locations in the world for street photography enthusiasts. Whilst the architecture is also of interest, for street photographers, nothing will beat wandering around the UNESCO World Heritage old town (or medina).

As you amble around the narrow maze-like passageways, you’ll be treated to locals going about their daily lives, artisans making products and shopkeepers haggling with shoppers on everything from carpets and souvenirs to pottery and lamps. The only challenge will be being able to capture sharp images as the narrow streets are fairly dark, so you will have to raise your ISO accordingly to have a fast enough shutter speed for handheld photography.

2 New Delhi (India)

DELHI, INDIA – SEPTEMBER 11, 2011: Indian cycle rickshaw driver sleeping on his bicycle in the street of New Delhi, India. Cycle rickshaws were used in Kolkata starting about 1930 and are now common in rural and urban areas of India.

3 Bangkok (Thailand)

Old guy from Thailand. Photo by Ykä Kiukkonen – f/1.4 | ISO 3200 | 1/125s

The capital of Thailand might be famous for its temples and sky bars, but it is also a wonderful street photography destination. Walking along most streets will offer opportunities to photograph locals going about their day or even artisans and craftsman working in their shops. You will also see plenty of street food carts which are also great points of interest for street photographers.

But arguably, the best street photography location in Bangkok will be in Chinatown along Yaowarat Road in the Samphanthawong District. Visit at night and the neon signs will be shining bright and street food stalls and restaurants full of activity.

4 Hanoi (Vietnam)

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Sitting along the Red River, Hanoi is the capital of Vietnam. Like most cities in this part of the world, you would expect plenty of street photography opportunities and you won’t be disappointed.

The Old Quarter is an explosion of activity and when you are not busy jumping out of the way of scooters, you’ll be looking in every direction for the next photo. What makes this location unique for street photography (besides the conical hats) is that the streets are busy from dawn to dusk. So you can shoot all day in a relatively small area.

5 Rome (Italy)

Trastevere street shadows. Photo by Richard Kendrick

The Eternal City is one of the most significant cities in the history of western civilisation. So much of its influence can be seen across Europe. The city itself is beautiful and worth a photography visit.

But beyond its museums, historic buildings and magnificent food, Rome also offers fantastic street photography opportunities. Whether its people whizzing about on their motorbikes, or locals chatting over an espresso, you won’t be disappointed with your street photos from Rome. Especially as your backdrops might just be some of those stunning famous buildings that we all know so well.

6 New York (USA)

Colourful street view in Manhattan. Photo by Perry van Munster – f/5.6 | ISO 100 | 1/125s

The Big Apple has always been a favourite location for photographers. Whether you are after cityscapes or food, NYC has it all. And naturally, it is also a great street photography location as well. From city executives on Wall Street to locals playing cards in Chinatown, New York is a city that is made for street photography.

7 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

Boca Juniors tattoo. Photo by Danny Last – f/1.8 | ISO 20 | 1/800s

Head to La Boca in Buenos Aries, and you can immerse yourself in two of Argentina’s biggest passions, tango and football! The colourful buildings will provide the backdrops for street performers who will go through their rendition of the tango. And when you have shot enough tango photos, turn your attention to football where street art of famous footballers and Argentina’s favourite player Diego Maradona is seemingly on every wall.

Just be very careful walking around La Boca alone as it’s a very dangerous place. My best advice would be to get yourself a local guide and be sure to leave before it’s dark!

8 London (England)

Black and white on Brick Lane. Photo by Don Ferguson – f/5.6 | ISO 400 | 1/210s

It may not be an obvious choice when it comes to street photography, but London is a great city for anyone who wants to look beyond the famous monuments. Head to the East End of London for those gritty and authentic street photography opportunities.

But even in the centre of London, there are plenty of places where you can capture unique street photos. For example, Leake Street graffiti tunnel, the skate park in Waterloo, the Southbank, Camden, Soho and even the passages in Neil’s Yard off Covent Garden are all great places to explore and capture very different photos of London.

9 Istanbul (Turkey)

Istanbul lovers. Photo by Wangting – f/2.8 | ISO 100 | 1/1250s

Straddling two continents, Istanbul manages to offer both modern and old in the same city. The Old City is home to the famous and historic buildings that are so synonymous with this city. But there are also plenty of street photography possibilities.

One of the biggest and best places to visit is the Grand Bazaar which is one of the biggest and oldest covered markets in the world. Photography is challenging in the market due to the low light, but you will find that around most stalls there will be enough light for handheld photography at a fast enough shutter speed.

10 Havana (Cuba)

Street life in Havana. Photo by Mark Allison – f/5.6 | ISO 400 | 1/100s

I have saved (possibly) the best street photography destination till last! No amount of time will be enough to capture everything that you possibly can in Havana. Every street in La Habana Vieja (Old Havana) is picturesque and there is always a photo opportunity.

But even beyond Old Havana, for a street photographer, the photos don’t stop. In fact, I firmly believe that you can simply stand on any given street corner and end up with a ton of great photos by the end of the day. The best advice I can give anyone for photographing Havana is to simply walk around and take your time. Oh, and to take plenty of memory cards!

Author notes:

There are so many other great street photography locations that I could have included in this list. For example, Rio de Janeiro, Paris and even places like Tehran, Tokyo and Beijing could easily be on the list. But then that’s what is great about street photography. Every street in the world has the potential for great street photos.

Author
Kav Dadfar

Kav is a full-time photographer and author of 400+ articles. He is also a judge on the Wanderlust Magazine Photography of the Year competition and leads small group photo tours around the world.
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Brazil’s first digital nomad village opens this month, here’s why you should go

Brazil is the first country in South America to offer a visa for digital nomad, and the first to create a digital nomad village.   –   Copyright  Canva

By Giulia Carbonaro  •  Updated: 13/11/2022

After living in lockdown for the best part of two years, the idea of packing a bag and moving to the other side of the world is very tempting – especially as the cost of living crisis bites.

If you’re able to work from anywhere in the world, you should consider doing so from sunny Brazil: the country has a thriving digital nomad community and plenty of things to see and do when you’re not working.

“Think of anything and you’ll find it in Brazil”, says Rafael Luisi, Assessor of Embratur’s Presidency, the Brazilian Tourism Board.

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“If you talk about culture, we have it. We have the best gastronomy, and it’s very different from the south to the north. If you talk about ecotourism and nature, we have that too. When you think about Brazil, you think about sun and beach tourism. It’s much more than that.”

How can I become a digital nomad in Brazil?

The country’s digital nomad visa is called Temporary Visa VITEM XIV, and people can apply for it at any Brazilian consulate.

The visa costs €97 ($100 USD) on average, though it can vary, and lasts for one year, but can be extended for a second. During that time, you can leave the country and come back.

Among the most important requirements is proof of employment or a relationship with a company based outside of Brazil and a minimum income of €1,455 ($1,500 USD) per month, or a bank balance of €17,460 ($18,000 USD).

Is it expensive to live in Brazil?

Brazil isn’t the cheapest country in the world, or in South America. But the cost of living in Brazil is much lower than in European countries.

According to the website Expatistan, food is 101 per cent more expensive in France than in Brazil, while housing is 131 per cent more expensive and transportation 41 per cent more costly. Overall, the cost of living is 67 per cent more expensive in France than in Brazil.

In Germany, the cost of living is 74 per cent more expensive. While in Italy, it’s 46 per cent more expensive. In the UK, it’s 99 per cent more expensive.

When should I move to Brazil?

Between November and March, during the Brazilian summer, is usually the best time to go, though it’s also the time when most tourists travel to the country.

The weather is usually sunny and warm, perfect for hitting the beach after work. And in case you want to catch the world-famous Rio de Janeiro Carnival, you can do so in February.

During the Brazilian winter, temperatures are still quite warm compared to European standards, at an average of about 18 degrees Celsius.

Where should I stay in Brazil?

Brazil is a massive country, double the size of Europe. Every area is different, so deciding where to go might depend on your specific tastes and interests. But these four things are important to every digital nomad: cost of living, fast Wi-Fi, community, and nightlife.

For all these things, these are the best places to move to.

Pipa

The first digital nomad village in South America is going to be built in Brazil, in the small northeastern beach town of Pipa.

The village will be created by the Lisbon-based start-up NomadX, who have named the project ‘Nomad Village Brazil’. The village will offer a range of accommodation options and facilities for digital nomads (including a swimming pool), and will open this November, with an initial run until 30 April 2023.

“You have the beach just in front of you, with the water temperature at 24 degrees Celsius”, says Luisi, adding that the village is in a great location for visiting other states in Brazil.

Florianopolis

White sandy beaches, dramatic-looking mountains, and a buzzing nightlife: Florianopolis, an island in the south of Brazil, has everything a digital nomad could dream of.


Florianopolis has one of the most thriving digital nomads communities in the entire country.
Canva

This is probably why the city, considered a paradise on earth, is a favourite destination for digital nomads in Brazil. There’s a thriving digital nomad community here, and plenty of co-working spaces to meet like-minded people.

Jericoacoara

The small fishing village of Jericoacora, or Jeri, has grown in recent years, becoming a magnet for digital nomads looking to work while surrounded by the stunning natural beauty of this secluded beach town.

Encircled by stunning white sand dunes and crystal clear blue waters, Jeri is located in the middle of a preservation zone and it’s known to be a haven for kite and windsurfers

The small town of Jericoacoara is for those digital nomads looking to relax by the beach.Canva

Belo Horizonte

Belo Horizonte is a big city, but not as busyas Rio or Brasilia.

Living here would be less of a tropical dream and more of the perfect balance between work and fun, rest and productivity.

The city has a vibrant nightlife, with plenty of bar hopping and networking opportunities. On the negative side, working from a cafe isn’t really something people in Belo Horizonte do, so you might struggle to find a place to work outside of your apartment.

Brasilia

The charm of Brazil’s capital is often overlooked, but the city has a lot to offer. Brasilia’s construction was heavily influenced by the writing of Dom Bosco, an Italian monk who dreamed of a utopian capital city in the ‘New World’. Shaped like an aeroplane, the city is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, home to many impressive buildings, parks and unique architecture.

Brasilia’s Congresso Nacional is considered one of the most iconic building in the capital. Canva

The city is very safe and every embassy is based here, so if you only speak English, you’ll be just fine.

Rio de Janeiro

Once in Brazil, Rio is a must-visit. The city is just so representative of Brazil, and it’s the first place people think of when they imagine Brazil.

The traditional carnival parade in Rio takes place every year in February. Bruna Prado/AP

If you need to build up your confidence to move deeper into the more secluded spots in Brazil, Rio, with its several co-working spaces, cafes and the international community, is a great place to start.

São Paulo

If you want to be at the centre of life in Brazil, go no further than São Paulo.

The metropolis is the country’s economic powerhouse, and you’ll find plenty of start-ups, multinational companies and digital nomads

The Catedral de Se de São Paulo is one of the most majestic churches in the city. Canva

With so much to do, it’s almost impossible to be bored here, plus São Paulo probably has the fastest internet in the entire country.


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52 Motivational Quotes that Will Change Your Life

QUOTESAUGUST 28, 2020

Curated Article https://memphisvoyager.com/

A COLLECTION OF OUR QUOTES OF THE WEEK FROM THE PAST YEAR

1. “Work until you no longer have to introduce yourself” – Unknown

2. “When I was 5 years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key to life. When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up. I wrote down ‘happy’. They told me I didn’t understand the assignment, and I told them they didn’t understand life.” –John Lennon

3. “Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing.” –Benjamin Franklin

4. “Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference.” –Robert Frost

5. “Build your own dreams, or someone else will hire you to build theirs.” –Farrah Gray

6. “Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square holes. The ones who see things differently. They’re not fond of rules. And they have no respect for the status quo. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them. About the only thing you can’t do is ignore them. Because they change things. They push the human race forward. And while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do.” – Steve Jobs

7. “My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive; and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style.” – Maya Angelou

8. “Winning isn’t everything, but wanting to win is.” –Vince Lombardi

9. “Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it.” – Steve Jobs

10. “Strive not to be a success, but rather to be of value.” –Albert Einstein

11. “Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life.” –Steve Jobs

12. If you’re offered a seat on a rocket ship, don’t ask what seat! Just get on. –Sheryl Sandberg

13. “I’ve missed more than 9000 shots in my career. I’ve lost almost 300 games. 26 times I’ve been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.” –Michael Jordan

14. “Start where you are. Use what you have. Do what you can.” –Arthur Ashe

15. “Certain things catch your eye, but pursue only those that capture the heart.” – Ancient Indian Proverb

16. “The only person you are destined to become is the person you decide to be.” –Ralph Waldo Emerson

17. “The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now.” –Chinese Proverb

18. “The best revenge is massive success.” –Frank Sinatra

19. “Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away.” –Maya Angelou

20. “There is only one way to avoid criticism: do nothing, say nothing, and be nothing.” –Aristotle

21. “Everything you’ve ever wanted is on the other side of fear.” –George Addair

22. “How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world.” –Anne Frank

23. “The person who says it cannot be done should not interrupt the person who is doing it.” –Chinese Proverb

24. Education costs money. But then so does ignorance. –Sir Claus Moser

25. “I have learned over the years that when one’s mind is made up, this diminishes fear.” –Rosa Parks

26. “Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.” –Martin Luther King Jr.

27. “The question isn’t who is going to let me; it’s who is going to stop me.” –Ayn Rand

28. “No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.” – Eleanor Roosevelt

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29. “When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it.” –Henry Ford

30. “Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.” – Mark Twain

31. “Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people.” – Eleanor Roosevelt

32. “Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.” – Mahatma Gandhi

33. “Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do.” – Mark Twain

34. “It is our choices, that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities.” – J. K Rowling

35. “Take up one idea. Make that one idea your life – think of it, dream of it, live on that idea. Let the brain, muscles, nerves, every part of your body, be full of that idea, and just leave every other idea alone. This is the way to success.” – Swami Vivekananda

36. “If you don’t design your own life plan, chances are you’ll fall into someone else’s plan. And guess what they have planned for you? Not much.” – Jim Rohn

37. “You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something – your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. This approach has never let me down, and it has made all the difference in my life.” – Steve Jobs

38. “The most common way people give up their power is by thinking they don’t have any.” —Alice Walker

39. “If you hear a voice within you say “you cannot paint,” then by all means paint and that voice will be silenced.” —Vincent Van Gogh

40. “I have been impressed with the urgency of doing. Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Being willing is not enough; we must do.” —Leonardo da Vinci

41. “Limitations live only in our minds. But if we use our imaginations, our possibilities become limitless.” —Jamie Paolinetti

42. “We can’t help everyone, but everyone can help someone.” —Ronald Reagan

43. “Nothing will work unless you do.” —Maya Angelou

44. “The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.” – Lao Tzu

45. “Tough times never last, but tough people do” – Dr. Robert Schuller

46. ““Don’t count the days, make the days count.” – Muhammad Ali

47. “Never give up on a dream just because of the time it will take to accomplish it. The time will pass anyway.” – Earl Nightingale

48. “Someday is not a day of the week.” – Denise Brennan-Nelson

49. “Obsessed is just a word the lazy use to describe the dedicated” – Russell Warren

50. “Even if you are on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there.” – Will Rogers

51. “If everything seems under control, you’re just not going fast enough.” – Mario Andretti

52. “Failure is the condiment that gives success its flavor.” – Truman Capote

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Travel Photography Equipment Guide for Beginners

September 4, 2020/in Seasonal & Travel Photography/by Infocus Guest Author

Every picture tells a story and I’m passionate about telling stories and sharing my travel experiences through my landscape and travel photography websites.

Quite often, people ask me about what kind of camera gear I use to capture my images. Back in the 1970s, I started out shooting with a simple Olympus film camera. I am a photographer that doesn’t rely on a lot of fancy technical gear. There’s a lot of people that think that if you don’t have the perfect camera, the latest gear, or the best accessories, then you’re not ready to be an effective travel photographer. But, it’s not the tools that make the photographer. Tools simply help you to bring your ideas to life. If it’s my iPhone that’s in my pocket when I see the perfect shot – then that’s what I shoot with.

Travel photography at golden hour with a wide-angle lens

Having had the privilege of working with Canon Canada for 14 years, I’ve had a chance to meet and work with some incredible photographers. Their stories and experiences have changed the way I look at things. I’ve also had the privilege of trying out a lot of different types of travel photography equipment. Listed below are some ideas I’d like to share.

Unlimited Photo Storage

Travel Photography Cameras

So, what makes the best camera for travel photography? This is a complicated and constantly-evolving question to answer, but it’s probably a camera that allows you to capture great-quality images and doesn’t weigh a ton. Camera manufacturers are always changing their line-up with the latest and greatest features, but the things to look for in a good travel camera is image quality, long battery life, size and weight, simple to use, and that doesn’t cost a fortune. The most important thing about a travel camera is that it doesn’t get in your way of enjoying the adventure and at the same time delivers stunning images. The best travel camera for you is going to be very dependent on your needs and situation.

Fine Art Black & White Photography

I’ve gone through a number of camera bodies throughout the years but, for now, have settled on the Canon EOS 6D full-frame DSLR camera. I have investigated and tried mirrorless cameras, but because the weight wasn’t significantly less, I’ve stuck with what works for me and gets me great photos. The Canon 6D is one of the lightest weight DSLR cameras (1.7 pounds with the battery). The camera battery gives me decent life (if I’m not using GPS). The processor delivers enhanced noise reduction and exceptional processing speed, all in a compact body. Because if it’s compact size, it fits into my hand like a glove.

Camera Lenses for Travel Photography

Whilst it would be wonderful to have a large range of lenses to take with you on trips, the reality of travel is that you can only carry so much before you feel like a weighed-down camel. It’s better to try and focus on getting a smaller number of lenses that work well in a wide variety of situations. I personally use three lenses 99% of the time. When we consider travel photography, we capture landscapes, portraits, street scenes, architecture, and so on — all of these subjects require different lenses to be properly framed.

So, let’s look at a few lenses.

  • The “Do It All” Camera LensThe 24-70mm lens or 24-105mm lens is enormously versatile. The 24-105mm lens is the one I use mostly because of its versatility. It gives me a wide-angle to nearly telephoto range and allows me to capture large landscapes, close-up portraits, and everything else in between without having to change lenses. It’s a good size and doesn’t weigh a lot.
Travel Photography with Canon 24-105 F4 Lens
  • My Canon EF 24–105mm F/4L is II USM  camera lens is a great general-purpose lens and was a great value when I purchased it with my 6D DSLR kit. If I could only take one lens while I’m hiking or biking, this is the one. AT 24mm, it is especially valuable for landscape photography and for capturing images in tight places. The 105mm focal length on the long end is really useful for a wide range of subjects, including portraits.
  • The Ultra Wide Zoom LensThe 16-35mm lens or something close to it is the ultimate go-to lens for a travel photographer looking to capture landscapes, cityscapes, or even internal building spaces. Not all wide-angle lenses are the same, so you need to do a little research. You want to make sure it creates sharp, beautiful images with little to no barrel distortion or fish-eye effect. Some lenses are better at this than others.I love my Canon 16-35 F/4L IS wide-angle lens and it has been popular with many landscape photographers. It’s an extremely sharp ultra-wide-angle zoom lens, delivering prime-grade image sharpness right into full-frame corners. A stellar-performing image stabilization system makes this lens a great lens. I can use it at the top of a windy mountain and shoot incredible quality, deep depth of field imagery without the use of a tripod. I had the Canon 11-24mm F/4L fisheye lens out in the field many times, but it was heavier and necessitated me carrying a larger camera bag.
  • The Telephoto LensHaving a good quality telephoto lens in your travel kit is a big plus for landscape photography. Sometimes you just need that tighter close-up shot to get more detailed photos. I would recommend a 70-200mm telephoto zoom lens because of its versatility. You can get a little longer, like a 100-400mm, but it adds weight and costs a lot more. The 70-200mm f/2.8L is what I use, but it’s also the heaviest lens in my kit.
Frozen flowers with a Telephoto or Macro Photography Lens
  • I use Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM telephoto lens for my travel photography. This lens gives me an impressive image quality and focuses accurately very fast. It has a 4-stop image stabilization, weather sealing, and has become one of my favorite and most-used lenses. I love the image stabilization on this lens which helps me to obtain sharp images even while I’m hand-holding the camera.

So, for travel photography, it’s better to try and focus on getting a smaller number of lenses that work well in a wide variety of situations. That way, you are more likely to take them with you and use them.

Fotor 300x250

Camera Bags for Travel Photography

There are a lot of camera bags on the market today and so many options to choose from. It can get a bit confusing trying to figure out which one is the best bag for travel photography. Unfortunately, there is no one-size-fits-all solution, so you must do your research. Being a travel photographer means you have to look at not only size; but also… do you need one that’s completely waterproof, crush-proof, designed for climbing rocks as well as hiking? If you are swimming through the Zion Park Narrows – then that’s a completely different story.

Landscape photography by Peter Dulis

The following are some questions to ask yourself:

  • Do I want the bag to be multi-functional so it can act as both a camera bag and a day pack?
  • Do I want to carry a laptop computer or tablet in the bag?
  • Do I need a trolley strap included so you can attach it to rolling luggage?

Camera backpacks are one of the most popular options for carrying around your gear, but you may also consider a shoulder bag. Sling bags that have one strap offer quick and easy access to a camera. Holster cases are designed to be used with a camera and a single lens if you want a lightweight option for biking. Spending money on the right bag to protect your gear is cheaper in the long run. So which bag is the best bag for you?

Long exposure travel photography using a tripod – Niagara Falls, Canada

I think it’s best to take your gear to the store and try out a bunch of camera bags – that’s what I did. So, here’s what I use:

  • My Lowepro Classified 160 AW shoulder bag is great for one camera plus three lenses and goes with me everywhere. Plus, the bag is easy to store in overhead bins on a flight.
  • The Alta Access 28X shoulder bag is what I pull out when I have a few extra lenses to haul around. The bag effortlessly carries a professional gear kit which consists of my Canon 6D DSLR, 4-5 lenses (up to 70-200mm), a flash, and a multitude of accessories. It also is no problem to store in overhead bins on a flight.
  • I also use a Lowepro holster bag when I’m biking. It provides good protection in a small package for my camera and attached lens.
Nomatic

Other Useful Travel Photography Accessories

  • I highly recommend carrying a lightweight carbon fiber photography tripod. I love my Sirui T-025SK carbon fiber travel tripod. It’s super lightweight and folds up into a 12-inch length. It’s maybe not the sturdiest of tripods, but it’s so much easier to carry around when hiking and biking.
  • I also carry a circular polarizer filter which helps to reduce reflections and glare by filtering out light that has become polarized due to reflection from a non-metallic surface. It cuts down on certain types of light in a way that can benefit your images.
  • 6 to 10 Stop ND filters can be really useful for landscape photography when you want to slow down your shutter speed to capture creative landscape photos.
Wide Angle Lens Photography from Jokusarlon, Iceland

Not Just Camera Gear

Besides camera gear, it is also important for travel photographers to dress properly to handle cold and stormy weather. When I’m out and about and the temperatures start falling, there’s nothing better than a great winter jacket. I love my Eider Men’s Lillehammer III Jacket with underarm air vents in case it gets really hot. Good, waterproof hiking boots and thick wool socks are critical. I have owned a pair of Guardo boots for about one year and love them. They’re stylish, comfy, warm, and have a super grip on slippery surfaces. I find that if you don’t want to get sick, keep your head, chest, and feet warm. This merino wool t-shirt is top quality and offers great warmth.

Travel photography isn’t just about making photographs; it’s about choosing a life of curiosity, exploration, and wonder… immersing yourself in the world around you. If you want to be an effective travel photographer, it is important to carry the right photography equipment and know how to use it. I hope you find these tips useful to get started. Do you have any questions? If so feel free to ask them in the comments below:

Having had the privilege of working with Canon Canada for 14 years, I’ve had a chance to meet & work with some incredible photographers and printing experts. Their stories and experiences have changed the way I look at things. Photography isn’t just about making photographs; it’s about choosing a life of curiosity, exploration, wonder, and immersing yourself in the world around you. Follow our adventures at – www.photographyadventures.ca and get your FREE e-book today – “5 Truly Amazing Places to Visit Before it’s too late!

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      Gentilly Fest

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      For this particular festival, the stage backdrop could not have been better.

      This gospel choir was performing in a huge tent. Very dark. I shot shutter priority and set auto ISO. From this focal length, the grain is seems to be relatively low.

      Using a telephoto lens in this scenario has its challenges. I have to use high shutter speeds to avoid focus blur. Somehow in this shot, my subject was dancing and her action was basically frozen. yet the passerby shows motion.

      Candid shots of participants are my personal favorites.

      Sometimes you just have to DANCE!


      Get Seasons | Desktop by Rebecca Stice as Photoshop Actions or Lightroom Presets

      All photos from this event were shot with; my first generation Nikon Z6 mirrorless, coupled with my Nikon 18-300 mm zoom.

      I chose this particular setup for two main reasons; it allows wide-angle shots of the stage as well as crowd interaction. Secondly, I am able to quickly get long range candid portrait shoots. (my favorite) I had to park quite a way from the event so I chose not to carry any other equipment. Very wise choice!

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      Gospel Brunch…Ground Zero…Biloxi MS

      I was given the amazing opportunity to do my thing with Low Light Photography. Low-Light Event Photography is one of my favorite genres.

      I think I enjoy the challenge. In order to create a photo, the main ingredient is of course LIGHT. And, as you can see there is very little of it.

      My low-light photography requires some degree of post-processing. I use several programs including PhotoShop. (considered by most to be the Holy Grail)

      Sometimes I go a little further. In this photo, I used Photoshop and PhotoScape. PhotoScape has been my “escape” from Photoshop’s demanding learning curve. PhotoScape’s main drawback seems to be its approach to layering.

      When shooting any event. I am constantly looking for opportunities to showcase crowd interaction and emotion.

      I try really hard to not use flash. (sometimes it’s impossible) I am constantly looking for ambient light. I try to stay completely away from flash!

      When I absolutely have to, I pray for walls to bounce the light. Oh yeah, I often use flash for promo shots with the artist, before or after the performance.

      From a personal point of view, this is my favorite shot. Black and White, contrast, showing texture, and illuminated with ambient light.

      I began this shoot using my first generation Nikon Z6 Mirrorless, coupled with my Tamron 24-70mm, f2.8. Later I switched to my Nikon 18-300mm FX lens. Not known for its low light capabilities, but excellent for long-range candid shots. I ended my session with my go-to; Nikon 50mm, f1.8 Prime.

      In conclusion, I would like to thank the Owners and Management not only for the opportunity to practice my craft but also for the opportunity to participate in an event for such a worthy cause; The Mississippi Center for Autism and Developmental Disorders.

      Watch for upcoming opportunities to support Brest Cancer Awareness and Research During the month of October. Ground Zero’s integration into the Biloxi community is having a phenomenally positive impact!



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      New Orleans Holiday Cocktail Crawl

      There’s perhaps no place better than New Orleans for a holiday cocktail crawl. In addition to signature cocktails, festive decor is found in abundance throughout the French Quarter and Central Business District. Block out an afternoon or evening for the spots below, and please remember to drink responsibly on your crawl.

      Davenport Lounge Holiday Cocktail (Photo: Justen Williams)

      BAR MARILOU

      Bar Marilou may be the newest spot on this list, but it makes for an excellent starting point before heading off into the French Quarter. Enjoy a handful of holiday cocktails including Diable de Noël with vodka, ancho chili liqueur, Cynar, dark chocolate Godiva, pomegranate, cranberry, and disco snow.

      THE SAZERAC BAR

      Head to the Roosevelt Hotel next, first to ooh and ahh at their lobby decorated with over 60,000 twinkling lights. Then pop on over to The Sazerac Bar to sip on the Winter Old Fashioned, a holiday-spiced twist on the old drink with Buffalo Trace Bourbon, apple-clove syrup, and cranberry and orange bitters.

      Carousel Bar (Photo: Rebecca Todd)

      DAVENPORT LOUNGE

      Our next stop is the festive Ritz Carlton, which will be fully decked out for the season. Head to Davenport Lounge for jazz and a cocktail during your stop.

      CAROUSEL BAR

      Located inside Hotel Monteleone, Carousel Bar is as whimsical as it sounds. Add the lobby’s festive decor, and it makes for a perfect holiday cocktail setting. Enjoy the Reveillon Buttered Rum or Holiday Sidecar this December.

      French 75 Bar Holiday Cocktail (Photo: Rebecca Todd)

      FRENCH 75 BAR

      Arnaud’s French 75 Bar serves classic New Orleans cocktails and tasty bites, including their famous soufflé potatoes. Stop by to see which seasonal cocktails they have up their sleeve.

      BOMBAY CLUB

      This spot specializes in martinis, but we’d recommend the Brandy Milk Punch, a sweet, creamy Cognac drink perfect for the holidays.

      RIB ROOM

      Step inside the Rib Room at Omni Royal Orleans Hotel for a special holiday cocktail: Aged Creole Eggnog. Enjoy the notes of bourbon, Cognac, and dark rum all while cozying up to the bar. 

      For even more holiday cocktail ideas, and for everything Holidays New Orleans style, see here.

      Post Written and Produced by; neworleans.com

      Find the perfect accommodations & book NOW @ https://willielumpkin.inteletravel.com/booktravel.cfm

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      Urban Stroll…

      Houston TX…..H Town

      sometimes you just look up and you just SEE things….

      In my beginning attempts to enjoy this particular niche within the scope of “urban architectural street photography”(my terminology), I quickly realized that you must keep your head on a swivel.

      Keep an EYE out for perspectives that just jump out at you. They are everywhere, left, right, UP, and down. By the way; when they jump out at you, please UNDERSTAND, it came from “with-in.”

      This caught MY eye. The foliage seems to envelop the buildings in the background. Not only creating a natural frame but, also adding to the feeling of depth.

      I absolutely Love the color contrast in this shot. Looks like October to me, this was actually taken on Christmas Eve 2021.

      reflections everywhere….

      I shoot around water often, and the reflections always suck me in. Be careful, they will get you too!

      i call this “symmetrical lines”

      I have always been taught to use and follow lines. Which ones should I follow?

      sometimes i just get real crazy….for some reason i like it this way….

      When I returned to the hotel, downloaded, and began to sort, I realized immediately that CONTRAST identified with my Spirit. Light, Color, and Geometrical contrast is what made this shoot unique to me.

      When I continued to sort through, I realized that the sky was very flat. Actually, this is one of the first things I noticed when I began my stroll. I remember thinking, that “I will just add clouds during post-processing” Which is simple enough to do.

      So I added clouds to a few shots and realized that “I” liked the contrast between the structures and a blue sky. The results speak for themselves.

      I thoroughly enjoyed my stroll downtown ” H Town”. When you get to a place in life where you truly enjoy what you do; it truly brings your Being (YOU) to “Heaven On Earth”. I am truly GRATEFUL!

      Health Wealth & Love! Lump

      All photos were taken with Nikon Z6 (first generation mirrorless), coupled with a Tamron 24-70; F2.8)

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      How to choose the images you want to sell online

      Author

      Philip Mowbray

      Philip is the Editor of Focus. View all articles

      You’ve decided you want to take the plunge and start selling your photos, so what’s the first step? Well, you want to begin with your core product -and that is of course your images

      Contents:

      – Overview
      – Different types of customers & their image needs
      – Get to know image licensing
      – Best practices for selecting photos for your store
      – The best workflow tricks to select your images
      – Pricing

      Overview

      The process of taking an image and then selling that image are both very different and there are a few key points to consider before you jump into the world of selling photography.

      First, you should consider what it is exactly you want to gain from selling your images, having goals in mind will help you stay accountable for the work you put in. How should also consider how you want your images to be used, and also, how you want to appear as a photographer – a lot of this will come from the images you choose to make available for sale and how your storefront appears to customers.

      We recommend thinking about yourself those questions before you start looking through your images for what to sell, and getting your plans ready for your store.

      The different types of customers & their image needs

      A lot of the success from selling your images depends on the type of customer your photography is suitable for, and how you market to them. As we’ve mentioned above, the type of images sold for wall art tend to very different to images used for commercial or editorial use and it’s important to keep this in mind.

      If you’re unsure about a particular market that your photography might cater to, or you want to sell your images to all types of customer that’s absolutely fine, and in fact, this is what most photographers do. It’s just worth noting the different types of customers, to ensure that your offering is the best it can be, and it’s also the best way to start thinking about how to select images.

      Generally speaking, photography customers fall into these three types:

      Commercial

      These customers purchase images for the purpose of ad campaigns, marketing collateral, products and so forth – basically anything that has a commercial objective associated with it.

      Usually, commercial customers are be looking for technically sound, good-quality images that are a true representation of the subject. What we mean by this, is images that are natural-looking and haven’t had too many filters or edits applied to them. Commercial customers normally apply their own edits to fit with their campaign or product – so allowing them that flexibility will, ultimately, increase your chances of selling.

      See more detailed tips on how to prepare photos for commercial use with our dedicated guide – and you may find that when it comes to your shooting habits or the type of image you find most aesthetically pleasing, this is where personal tastes can differ.

      Commercial buyers might use your images for marketing and advertising campaigns, and you never know – you could even see you image on a billboard! Photo by Levent Arslan

      Editorial

      These are customers that will use license your images for things like magazines, book covers, online articles and so on. And similar to commercial customers, editorial customers generally need clean, neutral and natural-looking images that accurately represent the subject.

      Editorial customers are likely to use your images to illustrate their features and publications. Having your image on the cover of a magazine is one of the most prestigious ways your images can be used. Photo by Leon Puplett
      Top tips from the pros:

      “Always think about editorial space – this is ‘empty’ or clean areas of images where text can be added for advertising and page layouts. For instance, if shooting a landscape format image, compose with the subject on one half of the frame rather than in the middle. For portrait format images, leave space above and below the subject.”

      – James Abbott, Professional Photographer and Writer

      Personal

      Private customers looking for images for personal use, usually for their wall can make up significant slice of a photographer’s revenue stream and it’s often an area that’s overlooked.

      This is where you can be a bit more creative too, as generally, the more bold and striking your images are, the better they are for wall art. There’s still some general rules for what makes a good image for wall art, which you can read about in our dedicated guide.

      Private customers (i.e. those buying your images for personal use or wall art) can make up a substantial part of your customer base, and shouldn’t be overlooked. Photo by Jason Kessenich

      Get to know image licensing

      When you’re selling images in an online environment, whether that’s something you do of your own accord, or via an agency or library, you’re almost always going to be selling them on a licence basis.

      Image licensing refers to the practice of selling a license to use your image in a specific way, rather than selling your photo outright to a buyer. It is the industry-standard method for selling photos for editorial, commercial and advertising use, as well as wall art in the form of a personal licence. Licenses typically take the form of an agreement which stipulates precisely the terms in which the buyer can use your image in return for the fee. Licenses are used to give you, as the photographer, greater control over how your images are used. They also protect your copyright.

      So to clarify, when someone purchases a licence for your photo, it means that they cannot use the image in any way they wish, or claim the image as their own. They’ve bought a licence to use your photo in a specific way, not the image itself.

      Further reading:

      We have a beginner’s guide which breaks down exactly what image licensing means when selling photography – and we’d recommend you read this in full.

      “When you’re selling images in an online environment, whether that’s something you do of your own accord, or via an agency or library, you’re almost always going to be selling them on a licence basis.”

      Best practices for selecting photos for your store


      Think about your buyers first

      Taking the above information in mind, look through your images and ask yourself the question, who would buy that image? How might a customer use this image? Getting into this mindset will help you the best select your shots.

      Less is more

      While it can be tempting to include your entire library of images, you really want to be showing only your best work – it will make your offering stand out much more.

      Having a finely-curated selection of images in your portfolio will show you’re careful and considerate about what you’re displaying. Browsing photography should be a pleasing experience for the viewer – nobody wants to sift through hundreds of images to find what they are looking for, you should be guiding their eye right away to what they should be buying.

      It might take a bit of tough love to whittle down your images, and it can also take time, being able to critique your own photos is a skill to learn, but it’s important to do, and it will help you with your photography development. You should also ask your peers, friends and family for feedback and their thoughts too – having an objective eye on your images can be really refreshing.

      But you still need a good number of images

      While it pays to be selective with what you include in your portfolio, you also need to ensure that your image offering isn’t tiny. What we mean by this, is that it’s unrealistic to expect that having a portfolio or store with just a few images will reap huge rewards for you. The more (curated) photos on your site, the bigger the chance that you’ll have an image that connects with a buyer.

      If you’re just starting out and only have a small number of images that you feel are your best, that’s fine–but if that’s the case, get out there and start shooting more so you can build up your portfolio.

      Quality matters

      Choose your most technically-sound images. Look at your shots at 100% to check they aren’t out of focus, blurry or have any other defects. Selling a bad quality image could easily land you with an unhappy customer, and repeat business might make up a significant amount of your revenue over time.

      You also want to make sure that your images have a good level of sharpness. Also, make sure they are free of heavy noise artefacts, usually caused by high ISO settings.

      Video tutorial:

      See how to best sharpen your photos (and not oversharpen them) with our demonstration.

      The bigger the better

      Choose the biggest possible size for your images in terms of pixels as this will open up their selling potential. Larger images will allow for a greater scope of use, for example, larger print sizes. We’d recommend sticking to the original size of the image as much as possible.

      If the original image size isn’t very large (as is the case with some smartphone images), you can use Photoshop’s Super Resolution feature to increase the image size without compromising on overall quality.

      Video tutorial:

      See how to use Photoshop’s Super Resolution feature with our video tutorial.

      Authenticity is key

      Customers, whether they are commercial, editorial or personal will expect your images to be authentic and a true representation of the scene. Keeping your edits small and simple, actually increases their commercial potential.

      Video tutorial:

      See the signs that you may be overediting your images as demonstrated in our video.

      Customers, whether they are commercial, editorial or personal will expect your images to be authentic and a true representation of the scene.”

      Show off what makes you original


      Your very best images should be what you display on your store and in your portfolio. The images that you are the most proud of, worked the hardest to get, those serendipitous moments – all should be included. Customers want to see what makes you and your work original. And with this in mind, being able to develop a unique style over time could help you immensely in the long run.

      Work in series

      If you work in lots of different photographic areas, or have images based on specific locations, subjects, or events – you should select and sort them based on their series (and subsequently display them as a set). Also, this way, if someone is looking for a specific type of image, you’re guiding them to a place with more similarly-themed images to browse and choose from!

      Top tips from the professionals:

      “Always capture images in both landscape and portrait format if it suits the subject; this gives buyers more options if they’re looking for a specific format.”

      – 
      James Abbott, Professional Photographer and Writer

      The best workflow tricks to help you select your images

      Image editing programmes like Adobe Lightroom and CaptureOne are perfect for helping you identify what images you want to sell with their handy workflow tools, you’ll see a couple of them below. The following are specific to Lightroom, but they also aren’t dissimilar to other workflow programs and in general, will all follow the same processes.

      Adobe Lightroom is an excellent resource for managing and organizing your image workflow

      Import all of your images & review in one place

      This is the best way to start to go through all of the images you’ve taken; to help decide what you want to include in your store. Also, it’s always a good idea to take another look through your older images too, as you may find that you’ll discover some hidden gems you disregarded the last time round.

      Create Lightroom Collections

      Simply put, Collections in Lightroom are a way that you can group images into a set. In this case, you can use collections to group images, for example, based on your favorites, or images ideal for wall art, editorial or commercial use. This again will help you whittle down the images you want to include.

      Use the Ratings system

      This is where you can give your photos a star rating between 1 – 5, so for example, you can quickly and easily rate images a particular number to mark those you want to add to your store or portfolio. You can also sort views by ratings so you can see how all of your images look together.

      Export your images in one go

      When you’re ready to create the files to upload to your store and/ or portfolio you can export them to dedicated folders and locations which means you wont risk missing important settings for some of your files.

      How to price your images

      Choosing the price you want to sell your images is a very personal choice, and ultimately it’ll be down to you to decide. But it’s also worth doing some market research to make sure you’re not pricing yourself out of the market.

      Look at other photographers who shoot similar subjects to you and see how they are pricing their images. It also helps to think about the lowest amount you would be happy with for your shots and work your way up from that figure.

      That doesn’t mean you should be undervaluing your work, however, and sometimes photography should warrant a high price to reflect your hard work. Particularly if the image shows a rare subject, or if it was complex or challenging to photograph.

      The photography world is ever-evolving and changing, so with this make sure you review your prices constantly too.

      The Ultimate Guide to Selling Your Photography

      Everything you need to know to start selling your photography online, drawn from decades of experience from industry leaders, professional photographers, and Focus’ in-house experts.

      Continue Reading:

      Where to sell your photos online

      All articles from this series

      Links and resources to help you sell your photography

      The dos, dont’s, & best practices for selling your photography

      Ideas for how to diversify your photography business

      How to grow your photography store

      How to keep the momentum with selling your photography

      How to set up and launch a photography store

      Where to sell your photos online

      How to choose the images you want to sell online

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